Making a career out of legal research

While many practicing lawyers have never heard of research attorneys, there are successful research attorneys who have been practicing for decades. For example, Lisa Solomon.

The ABA Journal has recognized Mrs. Solomon as a 2017 Legal Rebels Trailblazer for her work as a research attorney. After a stint at a boutique New York City firm and some time at LexisNexis, she began working as a research attorney for McCormack & Epstein in 1996. She then capitalized on her legal research and writing skills by becoming an independent contractor and freelance attorney for other firms as well. Today she not only has a successful legal research and writing practice, but she also has a freelance attorney referral service called Now Counsel Network. (Li, Lisa Solomon found the time was right for her career in online legal research (May 10, 2017) <http://www.abajournal.com/legalrebels/article/rebels_podcast_episode_016/> [as of June 4, 2017].)

By focusing exclusively on legal research and writing, Lisa Solomon not only found an untraditional career in law that allowed her to focus on her strengths, but she also found greater flexibility for herself and her attorney clients. Instead of having to cancel a vacation that he or she planned months ago when unanticipated research and writing comes up, a lawyer can hire a research attorney to do the work instead. If a lawyer is in the middle of trial and needs to submit additional briefing to the court, a research attorney can take this on instead of it derailing the lawyer’s focus on the trial. When lawyers invest in legal research, they invest in greater work life balance for themselves and success for their clients.

*Image copyright of Lisa Solomon

Disclaimer: No information contained in this blog should be considered to be legal advice. This blog is no substitute for legal counsel on any subject matter from a licensed attorney in your jurisdiction. The information contained herein is provided for general informational purposes only and does not form an attorney-client relationship between the reader and the author.